Crow Fair 2015

Crow Fair

Since leaving Texas we have seen a few Pow Wows, but nothing quite like the Crow Fair. This annual event has been active since 1904 and attracts the attention of National Geographic. There are parades, a rodeo, a very unique horse race, and each evening dancing competitions. Indians from all over America and Canada come to this fair; I even heard someone say that last year there were participants from South America.

We sat at the spot of the Grand Entry. It was amazing! The costumes created a rainbow colored sea of feathers, fur, and beads. Jim and I looked the part of the typical tourist with eyes bulging and mouths hanging open as Indian after Indian walked past us. This procession of hundreds of men, women, and children was accompanied by the intimidating pounding of drums and the somewhat eerie high-pitched voices of the Indian singers. You could almost imagine what it would have been like for the Europeans who first encountered these people.

Crow Fair crow fair crow fair crow fair crow fair   The dancing children, proudly showing off their costumes to one another, were such a beautiful contrast to the sad reality that many Indian children live with every day. Each one made me smile.

crow fair child

crow fair child 2

crow fair child 3beautiful little girl

While the families participate in the fair many of them stay in teepees; so many that the fair is called the Teepee Capital of the World.

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I’ll leave you with a video my husband made.

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Mr. Bones

While in Tombstone we stopped to watch the rhythmic moves of one Mr. Bones, a street performer in Tombstone. While my girls were to shy to partake in the dance; my son Oliver took up the tambourine and joined right in.