Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill

Our final excursion in Wyoming took us to the Buffalo Bill Museum. Also known as the Smithsonian of the West, we spent two days exploring it and could have taken longer.

There is a natural history museum with many animal exhibits. The children really enjoyed this area.

Draper Natural History MuseumDraper Natural History Museum

There were beautiful Native American costumes.Indian dress

I asked an Indian lady what this dress is decorated with, she told me they are elk’s teeth.

blue indian dress

fringe dress

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beaded shoes

When I consider how difficult the life of an Indian woman would have been, I am amazed she would take time to create such beautiful bead work.

Ration ticket

 

There was almost nothing as disturbing to me as this; the ration ticket. It was not enough that the Natives were driven onto reservations, but to take away there means to feed themselves and replace it with monthly rations of cheap food from the government was the last step to destroying their dignity as human beings.

battle drawing

Drawing by Sitting Bull

“The Killing of a Crow Scout” drawn by Sitting Bull.

Art Gallery

There was an art gallery, many items from Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show (including one of Annie Oakley’s costumes and guns), a large collection of guns, and so much more. One blog post can not begin to scratch the surface of all that is the Buffalo Bill Center of the West. If you are visiting Yellowstone don’t miss this amazing museum.

 

 

Sacajawea

Ever wonder what became of Sacajawea after her famous trek with Lewis and Clark? She is resting in peace in the Sacajawea Cemetery on the Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

Sacajawea Cemetery Sign

On our way home from the Grand Teton National Park we went in search of Sacajawea’s final resting place. Upon entering the reservation we stopped at a gas station and asked for directions. They seemed clear enough; pass Chief Washakie’s monument, follow the road to the left and turn on Cemetery road. Simple right? Well, you can see where this is going. We couldn’t find the road and it was getting dark. We had to find the cemetery and quick, so back to the same gas station asking again for directions. Thankfully a woman from the reservation offered to lead us right to Sacajawea’s Cemetery.

Sacajawea Cemetery

It wasn’t exactly what I expected. Aside from being located off a gravel road in the middle of nowhere it was also seemingly untended and overgrown with weeds and grass. But this in no way squelched the enthusiasm of standing where this magnificent woman is buried.

Burial Plaque

If you click on this photo you can read the burial information.

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This gravestone was erected in 1963 by the Wyoming branch of The Daughters of the American Revolution.

Baptiste Charbonneau

The baby boy that Sacajawea carried and nursed throughout the 6000 mile journey with Lewis and Clark.

Bazil Adopted son of Sacajawea

Adopted son of Sacajawea.

Sacajawea statue 2

A beautiful memorial to an amazing woman. She is holding a sand dollar.

“This sculpture represents a truly remarkable young Lemhi Shoshone woman who has just made a journey of 3000 miles with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and is viewing the Pacific Ocean. The sand dollar is significant, as it was given to Chief Washakie. He wore it with honor in many historical pictures.” http://www.yellowstonepark.com/2014/05/sacajawea-secret-gravesite/